Below is a collection of all comments collected on the Draft Plan to date. The comments are grouped in three parts: written comments from the Open House, online comments, and map-based comments.

Total Comments: 44

 

Comment ID: 1

Priorities

Topic: 6
Action: 4.2

General Comments

I think helping stimulate a general culture of tree planting — by residents, neighborhoods, and developers — as opposed to increased government funding of or mandates for tree planting will be of most benefit. This is the Druid City, so everyone who wants to show pride in Tuscaloosa should have showtrees on their property and on their street.

Comment ID: 2

Priorities

Topic: 5
Action: 1.1

General Comments

Comment ID: 3

Priorities

Topic: Achieving
Action: 22

General Comments

Lets start with a common phrase in town: “It’s a college town what should people expect” and any other iteration of the saying. The majority of CITIZENS follow this more than the bible. As long as they do this city will continue to be plague by urban sprawl, disastrous infrastructure, housing, and every other aspect with framework.

As long as citizens continue to express their absolute distaste for the University problems will only continue. Those in business take advantage of students and the citizens by building cheap and uninspiring structures and businesses. The entire City of Tuscaloosa is an uninspiring corporate built town.

Start by taking notes from the pages of UA’s master plan, Ill summarize:
1. KICK OUT THE CAR! A painted strip for bikes is not a bike lane or pedestrian friendly. KICK OUT THE CAR. But pedestrian and public transportation modes have to be improved DRASTICALLY.
2. Beauty. UA is known for having one of the most beautiful college campuses and that is not by mistake. Tuscaloosa is one of the ugliest cities as well. UA designs purpose build and well designed buildings that encompass beauty and design because its what humans do. Look at any other city from buildings, housing, parks, the list goes on. The City if atrocious and its everyones fault for being complacent.

If the city wants to grow absolutely stop trying to expand. That is the main issue for everything. You need too many parking spaces because you won’t hire the proper urban planners but also because people live so far out that they have to drive to town to get a dissappointing meal which they would prefer with a drive through or at least a walk under 10 ft. Bring the people back into the city! Open up the city by getting rid of the car.

Look at any other city especially Birmingham. What are they doing right and what did these people do wrong. Not everything will work for us but it’d be a damn good place to start.

Get over the negative mind set that it “Is a college town” that means absolutely nothing. Start building a town for HUMANS not robots.

There are very simple youtube videos to help explain many cities urban issues and how they can be correct and avoided. Take the time to actually learn about these things because most people don’t know what they actually want and are only taking a guess. They have to be shown what is good urban planning but it will be hard against their very narrow minds.

Comment ID: 4

Priorities

Topic:
Action:

General Comments

If there are plans to charge for boat stickers, and parking fees at lake Tuscaloosa, charge fees and parking for every city-owned property and park.

If you demand regulations and taxes for docks and seawalls on lake tuscaloosa, regulate what causes damage to them also- boats that cause large wakes. Also, enforcing existing laws regarding boat traffic and the distance from the docks would help.

Comment ID: 5

Priorities

Topic: 4 Growth Principles, 5 Growing, 6 Growing, 9 Dowtown/U Area, 10 W Tuscaloosa, 11 N Tuscaloosa, E Tuscaloosa, 13 HWY 69 S
Action: 7, 3,1, 1.3, 2.2, 2.3, 4.4, 4.2, 4.3, 6.1, 6.3, 6.4, 7.1, 7.3, 7.4, 8.4, 8.2, 8.5, 9.3, 9.6, 9.2, 10.1, 10.3,

General Comments

No more bars, please.
Do not permit conversion of single family homes to apartments in areas adjacent to UA.
Drive Warrior Asphalt out of the area, if they refuse to install air quality equipment!

Comment ID: 6

Priorities

Topic:
Action:

General Comments

This is so confusing I can’t figure it all out. Even after attending the event at the River Market and reading, or trying to read, the material here, I can’t figure any of this out.

Comment ID: 7

Priorities

Topic: Growing 9
Action: Springbrook – Frontage should be developed commercial

General Comments

I saw several people questioning the zoning that was put in place on the front block of Springbrook a little over a year ago. This property is correctly categorized as General commercial. Single-family residences do not belong on major commercial corridors, and the general commercial land use is consistent with neighboring properties along McFarland Blvd. It’s times we see some redevelopment of declining neighborhoods into higher and better uses.

Comment ID: 8

Priorities

Topic: Growing (5)
Action: 1.2 Restructure and modernize the zoning districtes

General Comments

Currently I believe there are two categories within “industrial zoning”. Heavy Industry and Light Industry. We ask that you consider maintaining both as they are many places where Heavy Industry is just not appropriate however Light Industry is.

Comment ID: 9

Priorities

Topic: Growing (5)
Action: 1.3 Modernize the development standards

General Comments

A complete street policy should be incorporated here just as it is mentioned as part of Connecting (16) 1.1 Adopt a complete streets policy.

Comment ID: 10

Priorities

Topic: Growing (5)
Action: 3.1 Seek low-cost solutions to infrastructure needs

General Comments

Agree but … This all sounds good however there seems to be no follow through. In order to implement sidewalks, lighting, streetscaping there needs to be a permanent funding source / mechanism to accomplish such. Therefore, please address the “how to execute” as well.

Comment ID: 11

Priorities

Topic: Growing (6)
Action: 4.2 Create a tree planting incentive program.

General Comments

Agree. Should be expanded to address saving and reusing landscaping that would otherwise be destroyed. Two example: A. The site of the downtown Homewood Suite Hotel – there were dozens of beautiful tress that were removed and destroyed – could have easily been replanted along city streets / ROW. B. There were dozens of crape myrtle trees along Stillman Blvd. which we recently cut down as they were encroaching on overhead power lines. Another low cost resource that could have been utilized elsewhere in the community.

Comment ID: 12

Priorities

Topic: Future Land Use and Character Types
Action: Riverfront Development

General Comments

Primary Uses should also include Hotels, Small Scale Retail and where applicable Planned Unit Developments (PUD)

Comment ID: 13

Priorities

Topic: Connecting 17
Action: 2.4 Expand the city’s multi-use path system

General Comments

Should also specifically include links to Stillman College as well as the residential neighborhoods adjacent to the existing riverwalk and proposed riverwalk expansions.

Comment ID: 14

Priorities

Topic:
Action:

General Comments

KICK OUT THE CAR AND THE CITY WILL THRIVE!!
Tuscaloosa needs to focus on becoming a community again. Fighting with college students and blaming them for everything is not the issue. “Its a college town, what do you expect” is a terrible excuse for the lack of development the city faces. Remove the car and bring people back toward the center of town. Allow for development of local business and not chain (it is possible if the citizen rally around these business and not blame the seasonality of college students. Look at literally any other college town. ((AUBURN)) retail/food. Birmingham is a prime example of where tuscaloosa should be headed. Look at works and what does not work. Not everything birmingham is doing will work for us but a lot of it will too. The citizens don’t know what they want just like a consumer. You have to analyze what cities across the world are doing to improve daily life and give it to the people so they can learn.

Comment ID: 15

Priorities

Topic: 10, 10, 10, 16
Action: 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 2

General Comments

West Tuscaloosa especially and the whole city needs more sidewalks.

West Tuscaloosa has been long ignored and is overdue for attention.

Comment ID: 16

Priorities

Topic: Growing – 5
Action: 2.1

General Comments

Strongly Agree. Our downtown and riverfront are key assets that we need to leverage. Infrastructure investments in the area are critical to attracting capital, investment and redevelopment.

Comment ID: 17

Priorities

Topic: West Tuscaloosa – 10
Action: 7.4 Redefine the MLK / Stillman / 15th St. Gateway

General Comments

There is a great opportunity to dovetail this objective with that of the TCRIC’s JWP/MLK roadway project. If warranted, with additional funding / resources from either Elevate or the City – upgrades to this intersection (landscaping, sidewalks, lighting, utilities, etc.) could be incorporated and done simultaneously. This would allow for leveraging public monies and more efficiently deploying resources.

Comment ID: 18

Priorities

Topic: Achieving – 22
Action: Capital Improvement Plan

General Comments

Without financial resources specifically reserved and set aside for the stated objectives listed in this plan, the goals of such will never be achieved. The plan will be like many of the other studies that have been undertaken over the years – it will sit on a shelf and collect dust without implementation.

Execution of the plan and attention to details is truly where the rubber meets the road.

Comment ID: 19

Priorities

Topic: 9
Action: Springbrook – Frontage should be developed commercial

General Comments

I am excited to see this area on McFarland be redeveloped as general commercial. Right now it is inconsistent with the intensity of the McFarland Corridor and a great opportunity to put something new and attractive in place of these aging homes. The highest and best use for this property is General commercial given the surrounding uses and traffic counts.

Comment ID: 20

Priorities

Topic: Living (14), Living (15), Connecting (16), Connecting (16), Connecting (16), Connecting (16), Connecting (17)
Action: 3.1 Remove barrier in zoning to duplexes…, 4.1 Continue to implement collaborative affordable housing plans, 1.1 Adopt a complete streets policy, 2.1 Improve opportunities for alternative modes of transportation…, 2.2 Integrate bicycle and pedestrian facilities into new roadway projects, 2.3 Create a sidewalk repair system, 4.1 Formalize a Downtown Parking strategy

General Comments

You cannot achieve any of the “Connecting” items if 4.1 results in the continuation of on-street parking everywhere. There needs to be expanded widths of sidewalks and new biking facilities to have a complete street and allow for EVERYONE (not just the rich and able-bodied) to access downtown and the city.
Access across Tuscaloosa is nearly impossible for the poor and handicapped due to poor infrastructure and lack of multi-modal transportation (bus, bike, etc.)

Comment ID: 21

Priorities

Topic: Growing (5) / Experiencing (18) / Competing (21)
Action: Focus development energy to create catalyst areas (2.1) / Expand the Riverwalk (1.1) / Develop a tourism strategy focused on the experience of visiting Tuscaloosa

General Comments

Agree

The US Army Corp of Engineer’s Old Lock Structure (along the former Tuscaloosa Country Club) offers an incredible opportunity to create something uniquely Tuscaloosa – similar to the way Greenville transformed its Reedy River, Chattanooga activated the Tennessee River with investments in Ross’s Landing and Coolidge Park and Birmingham’s Railroad Park what is now hailed as “Birmingham’s Living Room” has led to major associated developments that has revitalized downtown.

Comment ID: 22

Priorities

Topic:
Action:

General Comments

This is a great plan, but please consider addressing the intense asphalt smell in the evenings and over night. I believe it is from Warrior Asphalt Refining. We live in a historic neighborhood, and we generally love it, except for the toxic scent. As a citizens of the city, we should not be afraid to open windows nor should we be woken by the smell of tar at night. It’s horrifying for guests and visitors too. It paints our city in a terrible light and will make it hard to grow as a destination – especially since the smell blankets the university and downtown.

This is a frustrating issue to say the least. I hope it will be addressed.

Best regards,
-Imola MacPhee, 9 Sherwood Dr

Comment ID: 23

Priorities

Topic: 6
Action: 4.2 Tree Planting

General Comments

I am strongly in favor of planting trees, which not only greatly beautify neighborhoods, but also help to offset carbon emissions.

Comment ID: 24

Priorities

Topic: P6,P10,P16
Action: 4.1, 7.1,7.4,1.1,2.1,2.2

General Comments

Growing – P6 / 4.1 Expand City’s Green Space
West Tuscaloosa – P10 / 7.1 Focus Revitalization Efforts & 7.4 MLK Gateway
Connecting – P16 / 1.1 Complete Streets & 2.1 Alternative Modes of Transport & 2.2 Integrate Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities in Roadway Projects

Take advantage of specific and unique opportunities by writing them into your plans (Future Land Use Map) so that your stated principles, goals and objectives can be preserved and realized in a single project: A Linear Park / Green Space along the western side of the JWP-MLK Roadway Project.

Comment ID: 25

Priorities

Topic:
Action:

General Comments

Getting rid of the asphalt plant should be the City’s #1 priority. It massively compromises living standards for all of the city, in particular some of the most expensive residential subdivisions in the city (North River). It’s untenable and is a lawsuit waiting to happen when (not if) cluster health problems come about as a result.

The McWright’s Ferry Road project should be a priority also due to the rapidly compounding traffic problem north of the bridge. In line with the visions of the plan for the city, there should be a walking/biking path alongside all of McWright’s new road as it was initially pitched in order to give residents a safe place to walk/bike with the introduction of the new major roadway (much like the bike path on Northridge Road).

Comment ID: 26

Priorities

Topic: East Tuscaloosa
Action: 9.3 light industrial & 9.4 gatewasys

General Comments

Light Industrial should NOT be extended west of JVC road on Skyland. This is at the entrance to two neighborhoods, El Dorado and Woodland Forrest. This zoning is more appropriate near exit 77. Exit 76 is the gateway to East Tuscaloosa and this area should be developed to be consistent with largely residential nature of this part of town.

Comment ID: 27

Priorities

Topic:
Action:

General Comments

Here’s a comparatively easy/cheap (yet critical) problem to fix! A turn lane is desperately needed where Jack Warner Parkway meets 8th Ave NE. Currently drivers looking to turn onto 8th suddenly come to a dead stop in the middle of the lane on a 50mph parkway. It’s just a matter of time until this causes a deadly accident (it’s actually a miracle it hasn’t happened already, at least to my knowledge). Either add a turn lane or close it off entirely (in which case those drivers can turn just a little further down at Alabama One). This is such a critical hazard on one of our town’s most major roadways for residents & tourists alike. Needs fixing ASAP!

Comment ID: 28

Priorities

Topic: Growing
Action:

General Comments

Traditional Neighborhoods, Core – Care MUST be taken to avoid creating in-town neighborhoods that mirror the University Residential areas that surround the campus. Neighborhoods recovering from the tornado (Forest Lake, Alberta) have been targeted by developers who lease exclusively to students. Much of the housing they built is not appropriate to any other tenant class (many bedrooms of equal size, bathrooms exclusively in bedrooms, small common area). Further, because of a lack of enforcement on occupancy limits, bold landlords have stopped pretending they aren’t violating existing codes, building 4 bedroom houses and paving entire back yards, often painting stripes that create an actual parking lot. Allowing these violations has dampened any demand for property other than exclusively student-based housing (property values increase as the available revenue stream increases; expanding student-only houses drives away full-time residents whether owners or renters).

Reading the housing types that are appropriate for traditional neighborhood core, I notice that everything that exists in Cloverdale would fit the descriptions provided. When presented with a menu of options that includes student-based housing, developers will select only one thing on the menu – student-based housing. That will be the death of close-in neighborhoods. Current housing stock will be acquired, consolidated and demolished, replaced by off-campus student housing.

Consider specifically creating a housing type described as “student-based housing” and limiting the availability of that housing type in close-in neighborhoods.

Also consider requiring all leases to have a clause signed by tenant and landlord acknowledging occupancy limits and agreeing to complying therewith (under penalty of perjury).

Comment ID: 29

Priorities

Topic: Growing
Action:

General Comments

General commercial should NOT be allowed inside any neighborhood, regardless of how close the neighborhood is to a major artery. If someone’s front door faces a commercial property (other than across a major road), or if a residential property (other than multifamily apartment complex) shares a property line with a commercial property, the land use should be neighborhood commercial (limiting the height of buildings and general noise and activity level).

Comment ID: 30

Priorities

Topic: Living
Action:

General Comments

Springbrook is a neighborhood. People live there, and it has the type of housing (e.g., workforce housing) that consultant after consultant has noted is most in short supply in Tuscaloosa. Unfortunately, 5.61 acres inside the neighborhood has already been rezoned for business purposes. Allowing general commercial will result in the demise of the remainder of that neighborhood. Even the developers who worked for 2 years to get it rezoned didn’t ask for the equivalent of general commercial. Instead they emphasized for 2 years that they wanted, and plan to build, businesses that serve neighborhood residents. If the developers who asked for the rezoning didn’t express a desire for general commercial, then forcing general commercial on the neighbors makes no sense. In this case, based on the repeated arguments made by the land owners and petitioners in the rezoning, no one involved wants general commercial to exist in Springbrook. Please don’t impose general commercial in Springbrook against the wishes of both the nearby residents and developers.

Comment ID: 31

Priorities

Topic:
Action:

General Comments

Please recommend that the properties on the west side of MLK be designated for parks/green space. Currently it is residential. A green buffer would look best for the neighborhood (my children all live there in Newtown and I own their houses).

Comment ID: 32

Priorities

Topic: Future Land Use Map
Action:

General Comments

The city-owner property acquisitions along west side of MLK Blvd should be designated parks/green space. To do so will eliminate the current residential zoning which is not feasible for these properties where curb cuts are not planned in road expansion and where many lots will be made shallow by road and city right-of-way for utilities. To establish a park to increase connectivity, multimodal transportation, and to beautify and revitalize this area of west End will fullfil state’s goals of Framework, Elevate, West End study, and mayor’s “core beliefs.” It is a change that creates a public asset instead of wasted potential.

Comment ID: 33

Priorities

Topic: Land use map
Action:

General Comments

According to land use definitions in the plan, general commercial is grossly inappropriate for commercially rezoned area of Springbrook. Additionally, light industrial zoning and commercial zoning within the bounds of Woodland Forrest is inappropriate as well. It appears that despite city’s emphasis on need for workforce housing, city planners are equally as committed to eroding and eradicating such housing by prioritizing commercial and industrial investment over residential area protections.

Comment ID: 34

Priorities

Topic: Traditional Neighborhood — Core
Action:

General Comments

Traditional Neighborhoods, Core – We re-invested in our Forest Lake home after the tornado predicated upon Utopian promises, by City officials, concerning the future blessings/offerings which would spring from new the Mixed Use, RA and RD zoning. Specifically, we were told the new zoning would attract new and varied businesses that would appeal to the young professionals who would inhabit the large number of Forest Lake lots that were rezoned from R-3 to RA and RD. The new, additional density of neighbors would, we were told, provide the financial and cultural synergy necessary to make the MX zoning an economic success. To our eternal regret, everything that has been rebuilt in Forest Lake via the new zoning is student housing or car-centric, student-focused businesses built to serve the new, denser student housing market. In addition the to the failed promises of types of new businesses that didn’t arrive and the young professionals for whom no housing has been built, we were also promised the new zoning would all but eliminate the need for rezoning and Variances. Sadly, the opposite occurred: My neighbors and I have been forced to appear multi-dozens of times before the PZC and ZBA in our attempts to mitigate the on-going efforts of student housing developers and related commercial developers who want to turn Forest Lake into a student ghetto – like Colverdale. In my Forest Lake neighborhood, given a choice, developers will only build student housing that will only attract student-centric businesses. Consequently, a new land use policy MUST take care to avoid creating in-town neighborhoods that mirror the University Residential areas that surround the campus.

The concept of “neighborhood core” is specious if one confuses multi-family residential with student housing. Student housing units typically have configurations that don’t work for real people: very few families, young professionals, empty nesters, etc. want to rent or own 4 bedroom/ 4.5 bathroom or 3 bedroom/ 3.5 bathroom homes, duplexes or apartments – where the bathrooms are inside the locked bedrooms and student renters share a common area. Equally important to current land use planning is the future repurposing of such housing, when the students move on the next new thing (which they always do). Developments with these configurations will likely be cultural and economic sinkholes for the neighborhoods where they are located.
The “core” issue is further compounded the City’s refusal to enforce the municipal code’s occupancy limits (and several other municipal code requirements) in Forest Lake. Code enforcement is so lax that astute landlords have stopped pretending they aren’t violating extant zoning: they are building and remodeling 4/4.5 houses and illegally renting them despite the neighborhood’s long-running, on-going complaints to the City. Unless the zoning code is enforced, full-time residents, whether owners or renters, will look elsewhere to live. The neighborhood “core” concept, as presented, will only exacerbate what is already with wrong and not working in Forest Lake. The new land use plan must differentiate between multi-family housing and student housing if it wants to have value to all parties – i.e., not simply justifying more student housing.

Comment ID: 35

Priorities

Topic: Boards—8, Future Land Use and Character Types; 9, Downtown/University Area. FrameworkPlan191022_Chapt2-6—Chapter 2, Growing: p 28, complete description of General Commercial; p 29, complete description of Neighborhood Commercial and Chapter 3, Living: p 73, Objective 1; p 75, Housing Strategy Themes, “Protect Neighborhood Character” bullet.
Action: Designate the land use type for the rezoned tract in Springbrook neighborhood as “Neighborhood Commercial.”

General Comments

Commenter #7 expresses the opinion that the 5.61-acre tract in Springbrook neighborhood rezoned from residential to commercial in July 2017 (not “a little over a year ago”) is “correctly categorized as General commercial” land use type. This inappropriate categorization appears on “Map 2a. Future Land Use and Character” (Chapter 2, Growing, p. 21) of the draft Framework master plan. Commenter #7 correctly identifies the tract as “on the front block of Springbrook,” that is, inside the bounds of the neighborhood, part of the neighborhood. Commenter #7 further opines that “[s}ingle family residences do not belong on major commercial corridors.” The houses in Springbrook are not on a major commercial corridor; nine of the twenty houses on the rezoned tract face Albright Road, which is the eastern boundary of the neighborhood (and has been since 1945, almost three decades before the construction of McFarland Boulevard) and is not a major commercial corridor. (The owner of the R-2 property on 15th Street between Forest Lake Drive to the east and Lake Avenue to the west—the only single-family residence on 15th Street from McFarland Boulevard to Greensboro Avenue—would surely object strenuously to the opinion, “Single-family residences ‘do not belong’ on major commercial corridors.”)

Commenter #7 asserts, “It’s times (sic) we see some redevelopment of declining neighborhoods into higher and better uses.” First, that Springbrook is a “declining neighborhood” is a characterization not supported by home purchases over the past year. Second, given the shortage of rental properties for families and individuals of modest means and the significant loss of tree canopy in 2011, one can make a valid argument that preserving both the twenty homes (nineteen of which are occupied, some by long-term renters) and the mature tree canopy on the tract is a “higher and better” commercial use than any other.

As the City moves from the numerous master plans of the past to the new Framework comprehensive master plan, it should also adopt the new way of viewing land use that Framework recommends. Regardless of Commenter #7’s opinion, the description of General Commercial on p. 28 of Framework does not align with commercial development in a neighborhood, notwithstanding the location and perceived condition of the neighborhood.

The description of Neighborhood Commercial on p. 29 of Framework is compatible with development within a neighborhood, however. For Planning Division staff to assign the General Commercial land use type to the rezoned tract in Springbrook is an error and ignores the appropriateness of the Neighborhood Commercial land use type for land within a neighborhood, as described in the Framework plan. Neither the current zoning of “neighboring properties” nor the current zoning of the rezoned tract should be a factor in assigning a new land use type to the rezoned tract in Springbrook. Commercial land use type of the rezoned tract in Springbrook should be dictated by the tract being inside the bounds of a neighborhood and by that factor alone, as with the designation of land use type in any Tuscaloosa neighborhood.

Comment ID: 36

Priorities

Topic: Boards—8, Future Land Use and Character Types; 9, Downtown/University Area. FrameworkPlan191022_Chapt2-6—Chapter 2, Growing: p 28, complete description of General Commercial; p 29, complete description of Neighborhood Commercial and Chapter 3, Living: p 73, Objective 1; p 75, Housing Strategy Themes, “Protect Neighborhood Character” bullet.
Action: Designate the land use type for the rezoned tract in Springbrook neighborhood as “Neighborhood Commercial.”

General Comments

Commenter #19 “is excited to see this area [the 5.61-acre tract in Springbrook neighborhood rezoned from residential to commercial in July 2017] on McFarland be redeveloped as general commercial.” The area that Commenter #19 refers to is not an “area on McFarland Boulevard”; nine of the twenty houses in the rezoned “area” face Albright Road, which is the eastern boundary of Sprigbrook neighborhood and is not a major commercial corridor.

Commenter #19 describes the houses in Springbrook facing Albright Road as “aging homes.” They are aging, as the “significant portion of the city’s housing stock … over 40 years old” is aging (Framework, Chapter 3, Living, p 74). However, that homes are aging is irrelevant to the land use type that should be assigned to the land on which they are located. (One can logically assert that, had the owners properly maintained the houses over time, the houses would not appear to be “aging.”)

The description of General Commercial land use type in the draft Framework master plan (p. 28) indicates that General Commercial would be incompatible with, and inappropriate for, commercial development within a neighborhood. The description of Neighborhood Commercial in the Framework draft (p. 29) makes clear that Neighborhood Commercial is compatible with, and clearly meant for, land “in or adjacent to” a neighborhood.

Commenter #19 asserts that “the highest and best use for this property is General commercial given the surrounding uses and traffic counts.” Surrounding uses and traffic counts are not relevant to assigning a land use type to the rezoned tract in Springbrook. The commercial land use type assigned to the Springbrook tract should be dictated by the fact that the tract is in a neighborhood and by that fact alone. If one adheres to the descriptions of commercial land use types in the Framework master plan, then the highest and best commercial use of land in Springbrook, or in any neighborhood in the city, is Neighborhood Commercial.

Comment ID: 37

Priorities

Topic: 10, 10
Action: 7.4, 7.2

General Comments

The land the city acquired along the new MLK expansion running north from 15th street to the river should be set aside as green space. The lots are too narrow to be used for residential, as they are currently zones. They should be zoned as park/green space and used to create a pedestrian and cycling friendly connection between the neighborhood west of MLK and the Riverwalk and future riverfront development.

Comment ID: 38

Priorities

Topic: Forest Lake
Action:

General Comments

The Framework concept is a good idea for planning but the following comments are made with respect the core Neighborhood concept.

As described, the areas adjacent to Forest Lake and the University of Alabama will be in a Neighborhood core concept. The description identifies the blending of single-family residential with small (<3 stories) multifamily units and outlying businesses. Since the current area was originally platted and identified as single family, I request that the terms such as “blended” be defined or “restricted”. The original neighborhood was platted with utility services to serve single-family dwellings (generally two baths) and as such the infrastructure (and zoning) should be the foundation for how it could be changed going forward. A “blended neighborhood” sounds inviting but a “single-family dwelling neighborhood blended with <15% multifamily dwellings (or student rentals)” sounds better. This term will allow for blended use but will restrict the conversion of the neighborhood from single family residential to a predominantly multifamily rental neighborhood (like Cloverdale) that has an ownership bases that does not reside in the local community. Another approach would be to evaluate utilities and sewer systems and then identify areas that could be converted to multifamily without encroaching on the single family homes rather than making the entire neighborhood zone eligible to be rezoned for increased density or commercial use. The outcome will identify areas that may or may not accommodate increased density or commercial property use but will more effectively “blend” the neighborhoods and promote business that will support the residential population and vice versa.

Comment ID: 39

Priorities

Topic: MLK project
Action:

General Comments

Thank you for concrete sidewalks foe MLK project. Please also include landscaping, buried utilities, lighting, and pedestrian connections into downtown.

Also the access road to Country Club looks to be a hot mess. Maybe take a look.

Comment ID: 40

Priorities

Topic:
Action:

General Comments

I would like to object to the General Commercial land use type label for the rezoned tract in Springbrook. Please retain Neighborhood Commercial for this neighborhood.

Comment ID: 41

Priorities

Topic: Living
Action: 14

General Comments

I agree that we need enforceable standards to ensure the homes are maintained and the neighborhood property values are protected and increased. I do not agree that opening the aperture to commercial, multi-use concerns will be in the homeowners best interests.

Comment ID: 42

Priorities

Topic: Springbrook Should be commercial
Action:

General Comments

The front block of Springbrook should be shops and restaurants. It is next to a nice looking new hotel and other businesses. It would be a big improvement to help change Hodo Haven and all the blight around it.

Comment ID: 43

Priorities

Topic: Industrial and Multifamily Uses
Action:

General Comments

The city does and will need more ML and RMF type use areas. Small office warehouse/ business spaces will be needed near the city center to support our growing city. Also, small infill non-student multifamily developments will be needed to assist with quality housing that is not purpose built student or in large mega complexes. Duplex and similar low density attached dwellings with quality designs will also be needed.

Comment ID: 44

Priorities

Topic: Boards—8, Future Land Use and Character Types; 9, Downtown/University Area. FrameworkPlan191022_Chapt2-6—Chapter 2, Growing: p 28, complete description of General Commercial; p 29, complete description of Neighborhood Commercial and Chapter 3, Living: p 73, Objective 1; p 75, Housing Strategy Themes, “Protect Neighborhood Character” bullet.
Action: Designate the land use type for the rezoned tract in Springbrook neighborhood as “Neighborhood Commercial.”

General Comments

Commenter #43 says, “The front block of Springbrook should be shops and restaurants.” Commenter #43’s aspiration for the front block of Springbrook can be accomplished through the Neighborhood Commercial land use type, the appropriate land use type for the rezoned tract inside the Springbrook neighborhood.

The rezoned tract is across the street from a hotel under construction to the north, and it is across Albright Road from a gas station/convenience store to the east; however, the tract is not “next to … other businesses.” No businesses—shops and restaurants or otherwise—will “help to change” Hodo Haven. There will be no “improvement” in Hodo Haven until the owners of Hodo Haven and the City of Tuscaloosa address the serious problems of security and crime there and in the other apartment complexes south of Springbrook. One-story shops and restaurants alone on the rezoned tract would be nice for the neighborhood, but they will also not be “a big improvement to help change … all the blight,” if blight indeed exists. Property owners must do that.

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